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Funding, capital and investment for woman owned businesses - the OWBO, WOSB and NWBC

Updated: Oct 14, 2022


Funding, capital and investment for woman owned businesses - the OWBO, WOSB, and NWBC
Funding, capital and investment for woman owned businesses - the OWBO, WOSB, and NWBC

The Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) is excited to announce that it is awarding $50,000 in funding through its Small Business Start-Up Grants program to help Woman Owned Small Businesses (WOSBs) grow and succeed.


Woman owned businesses play an important role in the U.S. economy, employing over two million women and generating over $2 trillion in economic output. Additionally, they are driving innovation and creating new jobs. These businesses are deserving of the support and investment that OWBO can provide.


Through its Small Business Start-Up Grants program, OWBO is committed to providing valuable resources and support to help woman owned businesses grow. The grants will help WOSBs to improve their financial readiness and access to capital, develop marketing and branding strategies, create and improve customer relationships, and strengthen their online presence.


We hope that this funding will help woman owned businesses take root and thrive in the U.S. economy. Congratulations to all of the recipients and we look forward to seeing the great things they achieve in the years to come!


The facts


There has never been a better time to invest in women-owned small businesses (WOSBs). According to the National Small Business Association (NSBA), the number of women-owned businesses has increased by more than 16 percent from 2011 to 2012, and the number of women-owned businesses with employees has more than doubled, from 2.1 million in 2002 to 5.9 million in 2012. These businesses generate $1.1 trillion in economic output and employ 29 million Americans, which is almost half of the total workforce. Additionally, the Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) reports that women-owned businesses generate an estimated $620 billion in annual revenue.


So why are these businesses so successful? There are a number of factors at play, but one of the most important is access to funding. Despite increasing numbers of women owning businesses, many of them are still struggling to get the funding they need to grow and succeed. According to the NSBA, only 44 percent of WOSBs receive any form of government funding, which is significantly lower than the number of businesses owned by men (55 percent). In addition, WOSBs are less likely to receive funding from the private sector, which has a significant


Female entrepreneurship on the rise


There is a rising tide of female entrepreneurship in America. Funding for woman-owned businesses has surged in recent years, with organizations like the WOSB Fund and the Women's Business Ownership Council (WBOC) working to boost the number of women-owned businesses in the country.


According to statistics from the WBOC, the number of woman-owned businesses in the United States has more than doubled in the past 25 years, from 5.3 million in 1987 to 11.2 million in 2013. During that same period, the number of woman-owned businesses with over $1 million in revenue increased from 0.5% to 2.3%.


Given the growing trend of female entrepreneurship, there is clearly a lot of room for growth. For example, the WOSB Fund has committed more than $2.5 billion to support women's businesses since its inception in 1995. And the OWBO has made increasing access to capital for woman-owned businesses one of its top priorities.


These commitments underscore the importance of promoting female entrepreneurship. It provides women with the opportunity to start and grow businesses that can benefit not only themselves, but also society as a whole.


Challenges facing women entrepreneurs


According to the National Women’s Law Center, women owned businesses accounted for 21% of all businesses in the U.S. in 2014, but they only receive 3% of all venture capital. In a study of WOSB applicants seeking funding from the SBA, only 27% received funding, despite the fact that SBA data show that WOSB businesses are actually more successful than average.


A recent study from the Kauffman Foundation found that women-owned businesses generate more jobs and pay more than businesses run by men, and are more likely to serve disadvantaged communities. One major obstacle to women’s entrepreneurship is access to capital. According to a poll of female entrepreneurs by the JumpStart Fund, 43% of women respondents said lack of access to capital was the number one obstacle to starting a business.


Fortunately, many organizations are working to make it easier for women to start and grow businesses. The Office of Women’s Business Ownership (OWBO) is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides resources and support to help women start, operate and grow businesses. The Kauffman Foundation has also developed the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, which provides statistics.




Access to funding


Access to funding is an important issue for women-owned businesses (WOSBs), as well as for businesses run by women of all sizes. In recent years, there has been increased interest in supporting WOSBs and OWBOs, and many funding sources are now available.


Some of the most common sources of funding for WOSBs and OWBOs are grants, loans, equity investments, and business grants. Grants are a widely available source of funding, and they can be awarded by federal, state, or local governments, philanthropic organizations, or private businesses. Business grants are also available from financial institutions and venture capital firms.


Loans are a less common source of funding for WOSBs and OWBOs, but they can be a helpful way to finance a business. Loans can be taken out from banks, credit unions, and other lenders. Equity investments are another source of funding that is often available to WOSBs and OWBOs. Equity investments are investments that give owners of a business an ownership stake in the company. Equity investments can be made in the form of stock or tradable securities.


The Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) is a government agency that helps.





Why is funding essential to female entrepreneurs?


In order to promote and support female entrepreneurship, funding is essential. Funding can help female entrepreneurs meet the financial challenges of starting and growing a business. It can help them access the capital they need to expand their businesses and hire new employees. Funding can also help female entrepreneurs secure loans and investments. Finally, funding can help female entrepreneurs find professional support and guidance.


The Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) provides funding and other resources to help female entrepreneurs succeed. OWBO offers a number of funding programs, including the Women's Business Development Agency (WBDA) Loan Fund, the Women's Business Enterprise Development National Resource Center (WBED-NRC), and the Business Development Program for Women (BDPW). These programs provide funding for a variety of business types, sizes, and stages.


In addition to OWBO's funding programs, the Women's Foundation provides grants and loans to help female entrepreneurs start and grow their businesses. The Women's Foundation also offers training and support services to help female entrepreneurs succeed.


Female entrepreneurs face a number of financial challenges when starting and growing their businesses. Funding can help female entrepreneurs access the capital they need to expand their businesses and hire new employees.


Funding can also help EVERYTHING - DUH!


Types of funding available for woman owned businesses


Today, there are a variety of funding options available specifically for women-owned businesses. These options include funding from the government, funding organizations, and funding sources that focus solely on women-owned businesses.


Government Funding

The government can provide funding for a variety of reasons, including creating jobs, increasing innovation, developing new products, and promoting diversity.


Organizations

Organizations such as the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Women's Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) offer a variety of funding options, including loans, grants, and roundtable discussions.


Sources Focused Solely on Women-Owned Businesses

Sources that focus solely on women-owned businesses offer a variety of funding options, including grants, loans, and venture capital. These sources often require founders to meet certain criteria, such as being female-owned, minority-owned, or veteran-owned.


Are the Amber Grants real? - YES they are!



How to apply for funding


The Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) administers a number of programs and initiatives that can help female-owned businesses get the funding they need to grow and succeed. Eligible businesses can receive support for everything from start-up costs to marketing and infrastructure improvement. Here are a few of the most popular funding programs:


The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers a number of loans, grants and other financing options to female-owned businesses. These include:




The SBA provides information and advice on a variety of financing options online, and business owners can always contact the SBA's loan office for more information.


The Annie E. Casey Foundation offers WOSB owners access to a range of grants, including:


The Annie E. Casey Foundation offers a variety of grants to businesses across all sizes, and the amount of funding available will vary depending on the business's specific needs. To find out more information, businesses can visit the foundation's website or speak to a representative directly.


The Department of Commerce's National Women's Business Council (NWBC) offers grants, loan guarantees and technical assistance to women-owned businesses. The NWBC offers a wide range of resources.




The impact of funding


There is no doubt that funding for woman-owned businesses has a powerful impact on outcomes. According to the National Women's Business Council (NWBC), women-owned businesses generate over $1.4 trillion in annual revenue, employ over six million people, and are responsible for over 30% of the total jobs in the United States. Furthermore, the OWBO has found that WOSBs that received government funding account for 27% of all new business starts and 38% of all federal contract dollars awarded to WOSBs. This is a significant indicator that when government funding is available, businesses led by women are more likely to thrive and create jobs.


Moreover, funds invested in WOSBs are more likely to be returned to the businesses and the communities in which they operate than funds invested in traditional businesses. According to a study by the Kauffman Foundation, WOSBs create twice as many jobs as traditional businesses and their profits are 92% higher. Funds invested in WOSBs therefore have a larger impact on the overall economy than funds invested in traditional businesses.


There are a number of ways that businesses can access government funding. For example, small businesses can apply for grants through the Small Business Administration.


Everyone likes success stories


As the economy continues to slowly recover, more and more businesses are starting to emerge that are owned and operated by women. According to the 2016 National Women's Business Survey, there were nearly 5.9 million women-owned businesses in the United States, employing nearly 26 million people.


chukidmedicine.com is just one example of a woman-owned business that has seen success. In 2008, Chukid Medicine was founded by two sisters, Avey and Sarah Swartout, who saw a need for a safe and natural supplements for kids. Their idea quickly took off and they soon opened their first store in Utah. Today, Chukid Medicine operates over 46 stores across the United States, making it one of the largest woman-owned businesses in the country.


The Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) is dedicated to helping these businesses grow and succeed. OWBO provides funding, mentorship, and other resources to help these businesses become more successful. In addition, OWBO offers access to training and certification programs, as well as networking and resources to help these businesses gain the competitive edge. Success stories such as Chukid Medicine are amazing proof that anything is possible.


The future for female entrepreneurship


According to the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), women-owned businesses generate over $1.5 trillion in annual economic activity, including $483 billion in sales and $1.12 trillion in total employement. And, yet, despite these impressive stats, women-owned businesses only receive 31% of total funding, compared to 47% for male-owned businesses.


That's where funding for women entrepreneurs comes in. There are a number of sources of funding for women small business owners, including angel investing, venture capital, and government loans. But, the most important source of funding for women business owners is their own personal savings.


This is why the Office of Women's Business Ownership (OWBO) is so important. OWBO helps women business owners access the same kinds of funding as their male counterparts, as well as mentorship, networking opportunities, and other support services.


Overall, funding for women entrepreneurs is on the rise. That's because there's a growing recognition that women-owned businesses are a key element of economic growth. And, with more women joining the business world, there's plenty of opportunity for funding to grow even further.



Woman gain access to capital, opportunity with

National Women's Business Council (NWBC)


This year has seen a lot of progress made for women globally as they gain access to capital and opportunity. In the U.S., the National Women's Business Council (NWBC) released a report, Advancing Women Entrepreneurs: The Role of Capital, highlighting the crucial role that access to capital plays in supporting women's entrepreneurial journey. The report emphasizes the importance of providing women-owned businesses with the resources they need to grow, such as capital, loans, and technical assistance. NWBC is committed to helping women entrepreneurs access the capital they need to grow their businesses and create jobs.


In Europe, the European Women's Business Forum (EWBF) released its report, Female Entrepreneurship in Europe: 2015 Perspectives and Opportunities, which highlights the continued growth of female entrepreneurship in Europe. The report finds that more women are starting businesses in both the public and the private sector, and that female-owned businesses are becoming increasingly prominent. The report also looks at the challenges and opportunities faced by female entrepreneurs and presents strategies to support their growth.


Elsewhere in the world, the World Bank released a report, Women Entrepreneurs: Driving Economic Growth, which shows that female entrepreneurs are key drivers of economic growth.


What is the National Women's Business Council?


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is the premier national organization dedicated to empowering women entrepreneurs and advancing women-owned businesses. Established in 1984, NWBC has worked to strengthen the marketplace opportunities for women and advance policies that unlock the full potential of women-owned businesses. Women of all ages and backgrounds are encouraged to join the Council to benefit from the collective expertise and advocacy of its members.



The NWBC Strategic Plan 2020 calls for the Council to lead and inspire change in a number of critical areas: access to capital & opportunity for women, advancing women entrepreneurs, female business owners and access to capital; expanding markets & expanding opportunities for women-owned businesses; advancing inclusive excellence and growth for all women-owned businesses; and strengthening our advocacy and impact.


The impact of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC)


The Impact of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is phenomenal. The NWBC reaches across the country and brings together businesses, policymakers, and researchers to create opportunities for women-owned businesses. The NWBC is committed to increasing access to capital and opportunity for women, advancing women entrepreneurs, and increasing female business ownership. Their work has had a profound impact on women-owned businesses, and their work is continuing to shape the future of women in business.


How the National Women's Business Council can benefit women


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) can benefit women in a number of ways. Access to capital and opportunity for women is a top priority for the NWBC. Advancing women entrepreneurs is another core mission of the NWBC. Female business owners provide important insights and knowledge that can be beneficial to businesses and the economy as a whole. The NWBC provides resources, support and networking opportunities for female business owners. The NWBC also helps to connect women-owned businesses with potential financial and technical resources.


The NWBC provides access to capital for women-owned businesses through its network of lenders, investors and other partners. The NWBC also stocks its lending partners with data on women-owned businesses and provides assistance in complying with lending standards. The NWBC helps to promote women-owned businesses through its advocacy and education efforts. The NWBC monitors the effectiveness of its programs and makes necessary changes as needed.


The NWBC can benefit women in a number of ways. Access to capital and opportunity for women is a top priority for the NWBC. Advancing women entrepreneurs is another core mission of the NWBC. Female business owners provide important insights and knowledge that can be beneficial to businesses and the economy as a whole.


What the National Women's Business Council can do for women


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is a nonprofit, membership organization that helps entrepreneurs and businesses owned by women succeed. The NWBC offers access to capital and opportunity for women, advances women entrepreneurs, and promotes the role of women in the economy.



The NWBC works to increase the number of women-owned businesses in the United States by providing resources and support, advocating for change at the federal, state, and local levels, and connecting women business owners with each other. NWBC assists women business owners with everything from starting a business to accessing critical resources such as loan guarantees, technical assistance, and mentorship.


The NWBC strives to Increase the number of women-owned businesses in the United States by providing resources and support, advancing women entrepreneurs, and promoting the role of women in the economy. The NWBC assists women business owners with everything from starting a business to accessing critical resources such as loan guarantees, tech assistance, and mentorship.


The Significance of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC)


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is a national advocacy organization that represents America's women business owners. The NWBC helps businesswomen access the capital they need to grow and create jobs, and provides advocacy and resources to help women become successful businesswomen. Additionally, the NWBC helps to advance women entrepreneurs, by working to create an environment that supports and recognizes female business ownership.


How the National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is making a difference


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is a leading national organization whose mission is to promote the economic success of women entrepreneurs. The NWBC is uniquely positioned to make a difference because its members include both women-owned businesses and women-led businesses. The NWBC provides access to capital and opportunity for women, advances women entrepreneurs, and promotes the role of women in the economy.



The NWBC's Access to Capital & Opportunity for Women initiative is one of the organization's most successful programs. Through the initiative, the NWBC assists women-owned businesses with the application and review process for government contracting opportunities, such as federal contracts and subcontracts. Since the inception of the initiative in 1999, the NWBC has assisted over 6,000 women-owned businesses with government contracts worth over $1.5 billion.


The NWBC's Female Business Owners & Access to Capital initiative is also very successful. Through this program, the NWBC educates female business owners about the financial opportunities available to them, and provides advice and resources to help them start and grow their businesses. The NWBC has assisted female business owners with almost $40 million in loans and financed projects that support over 1,000 businesses.


The Importance of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC)


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is one of the premier pieces of legislation in support of women-owned businesses in the United States. The NWBC was founded in 1984 as a response to the flat-lining of women's businesses and the lack of access to capital and opportunity for women entrepreneurs. The NWBC's mission is to build and support a national network of women business owners and to promote access to capital, resources, and opportunities for women-owned businesses.


The NWBC educates policymakers, promotes public policy and investment in women-owned businesses, supports business growth, and advances gender equality in the United States. The NWBC currently has over 3,000 members, including small- and medium-sized businesses, nonprofit organizations, and women in the executive suites.


The NWBC has been pivotal in the advancement of women-owned businesses and has played a critical role in increasing access to capital and resources for women business owners. The NWBC has been instrumental in advocating for legislation that has helped increase access to capital for women-owned businesses, such as the Women Entrepreneurship and Business Expo (W EBX) which provides small businesses with access to capital, mentorship, and networking opportunities.


Women and the National Women's Business Council


Since its inception in 1991, The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) has been at the forefront of advancing women business owners, accessing capital, and increasing access to essential resources and networks needed to thrive in business. NWBC's mission is to increase the number and success of women-owned businesses and to fulfill the promise of the women's business movement.


Each year, NWBC promotes and advocates for policies that drive women's economic empowerment and inclusion throughout the nation. NWBC achieves this through its work on Capitol Hill, in the corporate world, and with educational institutions. The NWBC also provides resources, tools, and programs that support women business owners nationwide.


Access to Capital & Opportunity for Women

NWBC is dedicated to ensuring that women have access to the capital they need to grow their businesses. Through its work with the Congressional Women's Caucus, NWBC has been a leader in the fight for increased access to capital for women entrepreneurs. In addition, NWBC has spearheaded initiatives to increase access to credit and to promote smarter financial planning for women business owners.


Advancing Women Entrepreneurs

NWBC is also committed to supporting women entrepreneurs in their efforts to start and grow businesses. Through its advocacy and programs, it is a big help to female entrepreneurs and founders.


What the future holds for the National Women's Business Council (NWBC)


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is excited about the future! In the coming years, we believe there will be more access to capital and opportunity for women, advancing women entrepreneurs, female business owners, and the entire female population. With women making up half of the population and owning just over one quarter of businesses, we know that there is so much potential for growth and success for women-owned businesses.


In 2018, we made great strides in advancing female entrepreneurship. For example, NWBC engaged with policymakers to advance the Women Entrepreneurs National Monument Act, which would designate a national monument in honor of America's pioneering women entrepreneurs. We also teamed up with MGM Resorts International to launch the NWBC Women in Gaming Summit, a one-day event that provides female leaders with the opportunity to network, share best practices, and discuss how to break into the gaming industry.


Looking ahead, we are excited about the many opportunities that lie ahead for the NWBC and the women-owned businesses community. We are committed to working with our allies in the government and the private sector to help advance women’s economic equality and progress.


How can you get involved with the National Women's Business Council


The National Women's Business Council (NWBC) is a leading national nonprofit organization that builds the capacity of women-owned businesses to create economic prosperity for themselves and their families. The NWBC works to increase access to capital, increase opportunities for women entrepreneurs, and advocate for women in the business world.


Through its Access to Capital & Opportunity for Women, Advancing Women Entrepreneurs, and Female Business Owners programs, the NWBC helps women access the financing they need to grow their businesses, connect with mentors and industry leaders, and increase their chances of success. The NWBC’s work also promotes gender diversity among business owners, helps women access the most competitive markets, and leads the way in developing best practices.


The NWBC is dedicated to continually raising the bar in its work to benefit women in business. If you are interested in getting involved, the NWBC offers a variety of membership options and programming to fit your interests. You can also get involved by donating to the NWBC or volunteering your time. The NWBC is a powerful voice for women entrepreneurs and we need your help to continue making a difference in the business world.



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